Cvd Diamond Film And Pvd Diamondlike Carbon Dlc Coating

Diamond is also grown metastably in partial vacuum to form either freestanding films or adhered coatings. Diamond films of up to 1 mm in thickness, and up to 30 cm wide, can be precipitated by a variety of CVD methods (e.g. hot filament, microwave plasma,

Hot Filament Diamond China
Figure 4.17. The production cubic presses in Huanghe (the largest diamond plant in the world), China that can manufacture over 3 million carats a day.

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Figure 4.18. High pressure diamond synthesis technology advancements. The original production methods were based on the alternation of graphite layers and catalyst layers (invar composition). Most products made today are using mixture of graphite and catalyst powder, some with micron diamond seeds mixed in randomly. The latest innovation is to grow diamond seeds that are arranged to maximize the volume utilization (Sung et al., 2006). Such a new technology is now in pilot manufacturing in China.

2 cet 3 ece 5 tcc

Figure 4.18. High pressure diamond synthesis technology advancements. The original production methods were based on the alternation of graphite layers and catalyst layers (invar composition). Most products made today are using mixture of graphite and catalyst powder, some with micron diamond seeds mixed in randomly. The latest innovation is to grow diamond seeds that are arranged to maximize the volume utilization (Sung et al., 2006). Such a new technology is now in pilot manufacturing in China.

Pvd Method With Microwave
Figure 4.19. Former Norton Diamond Film's DC arc CVD reactor (the author helped acquire the Technion technology in 1988) and its produced diamond films for brazing on cutting tools.
Diamond Film Cvd
Figure 4.20. Former Norton Diamond Film's microwave CVD reactor (the author helped acquire the Wavemat technology in 1987) and its produced coated cutting inserts.
Microwave Plasma Torch Design

Figure 4.21. Kinik Company's 30 cm x 40 cm hot filament CVD reactor (the author helped acquire the sp3, Inc. system in 1998) with its diamond film products displayed from top to bottom: coated cutting inserts, coated silicon wafers, free standing diamond tweeter, and diamond pyramids formed by inverse casting of silicon.

Figure 4.21. Kinik Company's 30 cm x 40 cm hot filament CVD reactor (the author helped acquire the sp3, Inc. system in 1998) with its diamond film products displayed from top to bottom: coated cutting inserts, coated silicon wafers, free standing diamond tweeter, and diamond pyramids formed by inverse casting of silicon.

oxyacetylene flame, DC arc, etc.). Thin layers (up to 3 fim) of nano-crystalline diamond or DLC may be coated over a substrate of up to 1 m in length. They are deposited commercially by many PVD techniques (e.g. cathodic arc, methane ions, argon sputtering, laser ablation, etc). Both CVD and PVD methods are emerging technologies for depositing diamond (CVDD) and DLC (PVDD), respectively. These new diamond products can greatly expand the scope of diamond applications to non-superabrasive regimes, such as heat spreaders, optical windows, tweeter diaphragms, surface acoustic waver (SAW) filters, particle detectors, semiconductor devices for CVD diamond films; field emitters, solar cells, electron radiators, electrical capacitors, tribological surfaces, chemical barriers for DLC coatings.

The author had introduced several large production systems for CVD growth of diamond films and PVD coating of DLC. These systems were installed at former Norton Diamond Film (then world's largest diamond film maker) and Kinik Company (now one of world's largest DLC coaters). Norton's systems include

Figure 4.22. Kinik Company's cathodic arc PVD coater of amorphous diamond (the author helped acquire the Multi Arc system in 1997) in action and its products of DLC electro-luminescence (DEL) and LED heat spreader.

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Figure 4.22. Kinik Company's cathodic arc PVD coater of amorphous diamond (the author helped acquire the Multi Arc system in 1997) in action and its products of DLC electro-luminescence (DEL) and LED heat spreader.

Figure 4.23. Kinik Company's RF CVD coater of DLC (the author helped acquire the Ion Bond system in 2001) in appearance.

Technion's DC arc reactor (Fig. 4.19) and Wavemat's microwave reactor (Fig. 4.20); and Kinik's systems include sp3s hot filament reactor (Figs. 4.21 and 4.22) and Ion Bond's cathodic arc and radio frequency plasma CVD (Fig. 4.23).

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