Diamond As Playground

As nanodiamond was capable to form various components of bases, it was possible that these bases could be arranged on the diamond surface to form components of transfer RNA (t-RNA) or ATP, the omnipresent messengers in cells. They may be synthesized by attaching bases with molecules of sugar and phosphate. As sugar and phosphate molecules were likely present in the primitive ocean of the still warm Earth, t-RNA and ATP (ADP, AMP) could be present widespread as precursors of life, immediately after the solidification of primitive rocks (Fig. 2.7).

The attachment of amino acids or functional bases on diamond might also be indirect with cushions in between. Such springy anchorages could prompt the reactions of diversified organic radicals on diamond surface. The bouncing of acids and bases on a common template might have allowed flexible assembly of larger components, such as protinoids and t-RNA (Fig. 2.8).

Figure 2.6. A nanodiamond shed fullerene with illustration of molding and molting pentagonal fructose and hexagonal benzene. Note that this process of molding and subsequent molting can result in the succession of base pairs that are separated by 3.35 A, the distance of graphene like carbon rings held by van der Waals force, just like graphenes stacked in graphite. The base pairs formed by consecutive molting can be attached by a RNA rail in sequential order. In the diagram, the backbone of RNA is depicted by combining ribose with phosphate. Phosphate could be derived form phosphorous permeated silica (quartz) present in hot springs of volcanic origin.

Figure 2.6. A nanodiamond shed fullerene with illustration of molding and molting pentagonal fructose and hexagonal benzene. Note that this process of molding and subsequent molting can result in the succession of base pairs that are separated by 3.35 A, the distance of graphene like carbon rings held by van der Waals force, just like graphenes stacked in graphite. The base pairs formed by consecutive molting can be attached by a RNA rail in sequential order. In the diagram, the backbone of RNA is depicted by combining ribose with phosphate. Phosphate could be derived form phosphorous permeated silica (quartz) present in hot springs of volcanic origin.

Figure 2.7. The surface of nanodiamond particle could act as the primitive backbone to fasten the bases to be attached to ribose floating around.
Figure 2.8. The floating anchorage of biological components on diamond surface could allow flexible assembly of larger biological structures.

Once t-RNA molecules were formed, nanodiamond could serve the function of ribosome to manufacture proteins, although their yields could be poor. However, ribosome molecules are simply snug fitting of several very small protinoids. Consequently, it was possible that the stumbling of protinoids cast by nanodiamond could also form ribosome-like proteins by chance (Fig. 2.9).

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