Mikael T Bjork Heinz Schmid Joachim Knoch Heike Riel and Walter Riess

The operation of electronic devices relies on the density of free charge carriers available in the semiconductor in most semiconductor devices this density is controlled by the addition of doping atoms. As dimensions are scaled down to achieve economic and performance benefits, the presence of interfaces and materials adjacent to the semiconductor will become more important and will eventually completely determine the electronic properties of the device. To sustain further improvements in...

Nanoscience and technology have the potential to make a big impact on energy problems

Two recent reports1,2, published by the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) of the US Department of Energy paint an enticing picture of a sustainable and prosperous future facilitated by new technologies. The large-scale use of solar energy will be made possible by new solar cells, which are both cheap and efficient, and by the development of biomimetic refineries using sunlight, carbon dioxide and water to produce liquid fuels. New batteries or nanoengineered supercapacitors will...

Steven C Currall

During recent years, a burgeoning community of social science researchers has developed an understanding of how the public perceives emerging technologies such as nanotechnology. This issue contains three papers by social scientists that describe the 'state of the art' in this field and provide fresh thinking on the factors that drive public perceptions of nanotechnology. Such research is important because, ultimately, perceptions will determine if nanotechnology is accepted or rejected by the...

Todd D Krauss

The development of optically based biological sensors that can detect multiple analytes has revolutionized molecular biology. In addition to greatly aiding basic research, these devices have led to pioneering applications in gene expression, detection of biowarfare agents, medical diagnostics, drug discovery and forensics. However, most optically based biosensors, like the well-known DNA chip1, have limitations such as a slow response or unsuitability for in vivo use. On page 114 of this issue,...

Kenneth A Dawson Anna salvati and Iseult Lynch

Figure 1 Nanoparticles may enter cells in various ways by known mechanisms. a, Confocal microscopy image showing the active uptake of 50-nm negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles green by epithelial cells. The cell nucleus is stained with DAPI blue . b, Schematic showing the different ways that nutrients and signals can be taken-up by cells entry of nanoparticles could follow similar mechanisms Reprinted from ref. 10 2003 NPG . In phagocytosis which is mainly relevant to specialized...