Interplay of Science and Technology

Besides benefiting the lives of blind and deaf people, information technology in the service of sensory replacement and sensory substitution will continue to play another very important role — contributing to our understanding of sensory and perceptual function. Because sensory replacement and sensory substitution involve modified delivery of visual and auditory information to the perceptual processes in the brain, the way in which perception is affected or unaffected by such modifications in delivery is informative about the sensory and brain processes involved in perception. For example, the success or lack thereof of using visual displays to convey the information in the acoustic speech signal provides important clues about which stages of processing are most critical to effective speech reception. Of course, the benefits flow in the opposite direction as well: as scientists learn more about the sensory and brain processes involved in perception, they can then use the knowledge gained to develop more effective forms of sensory replacement and substitution.

0 0

Post a comment