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Figure 2. Growth and implosive collapse of the bubble in a sonochem-ical cell. The initial bubbles absorb dissolved gas from the surrounding liquid, and grow. Once large enough, the bubble resonates and absorbs acoustic energy. It quickly grows over the course of one acoustic cycle until it can no longer sustain itself, and it implodes. Reprinted with permission from [5], S. J. Putterman, Sci. Am. 46 (1995). © 1995, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Figure 2. Growth and implosive collapse of the bubble in a sonochem-ical cell. The initial bubbles absorb dissolved gas from the surrounding liquid, and grow. Once large enough, the bubble resonates and absorbs acoustic energy. It quickly grows over the course of one acoustic cycle until it can no longer sustain itself, and it implodes. Reprinted with permission from [5], S. J. Putterman, Sci. Am. 46 (1995). © 1995, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

have been measured in SBSL, while an order of magnitude lower (103-104 K) is more typical of MBSL. The chemical constituents of the bubble interior are also different, typically argon in many of the SBSL experimental studies, while in MBSL, they are related to the vapor of the liquid solution, each of the constituents being identified by the different spectral characteristics. Clearly, such a potentially chemically reactive environment has attracted significant attention from chemists and industrialists, as well as the innate scientific curiosity with such seemingly simple observable phenomena. Nevertheless, the phenomenon is much more complicated than first thought, and the complex nonlinear mathematics, physics, and chemistry make acoustic cavitation and sonolu-minescence an exciting area of research.

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